Underserved Survivors

Rape is not a women's issue, it's a human issue.

Reporting rape is not easy for anyone. Societal stigma makes it even more difficult for certain communities.

Audience

Who are underserved survivors?

Underserved survivors are people who face the most stigma, shame, and blame when reporting rape and abuse. They are less likely to be believed and to receive legal support due to rape culture, victim-blaming, and societal beliefs. 

We believe that ALL survivors deserve love, compassion, and justice. That's why we created a safe space for them to recover. Scroll down to learn more about underserved communities.

Underserved Survivors We Support

Elders

Certain health conditions can prevent elders from reporting sexual assault. Even cultural or religious beliefs can create barriers for support when it comes to speaking up about rape and abuse.

Trafficking Survivors

Stigma and shame are the greatest barriers for trafficking survivors. Because trafficking and sex work are often conflated, getting support is extremely difficult. Trafficking survivors are often mistaken for consensual sex workers and are often jailed for reporting rape.

Senior Citizen
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Adult Entertainers

Indigenous Communities

Due to their profession, they are rarely supported when reporting violence, rape, or robbery. These cases often go unsolved and the fear and stigma is greater for industry workers compared to people working in different professions. Adult industry professionals have fewer legal rights and less protection from sexual assault. Full service sex workers are often arrested and jailed when reporting rape.

Native American women are at the highest risk for sexual assault. 90% of the time it’s by a non-native perpetrator, according to the Department of Justice. Tribal courts do not have jurisdiction to prosecute non-tribal members for sexual assault, even if the incident occurred on tribal land.

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